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Below is a list of recommended reads for those interested in Australian Finches. These books offer great tips on nesting, breeding, habitat and general care. 
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Grassfinches in Australia

Grassfinches in Australia
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Gouldian Finches (Complete Pet Owner's Manual)

 

Zebra Finches (Complete Pet Owner's Manual)

 

 

Zebra Finches (Complete Pet Owner's Manual)
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Field Guide to the Birds of Australia 

Field Guide to the Birds of Australia 
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Map & Tips


Provided by Birdata - www.birdata.com.au

Chestnut Breasted Mannikin - Lonchura Castaneothorax

Other Names: Chestnut-breasted munia

Size: 11-12cm

Habitat: Grassland close to water areas, swamps, mangroves, cane fields etc. 

Distribution: Across Northern and Eastern Coastal Australia. (Kimberly to NSW Coastal) A presence in Papua New Guinea is also noted.

Food: Feeding off seeds straight from the stem. Live insects and termites. 

Nesting: 

Breeding:

Sexing: Both sexes are identically coloured. Males can be identified by their call and courtship dance.

Notes:

A very social birds and often placed in mixed aviaries. Although similar in colour, the females are known to be paler in colour to the males. 

Summary

Incubation:

By both sexes

Average clutch:

4-7 Eggs

Days to hatch:

12-14 days from incubation

Fledge date:

Generally 21-22 days old

Wean date:

 

First molt:

 

Sexual maturity

Adult plumage indicates maturity however not to be bred as per all finches until they reach the age of 12 months.

 

Article Extract from Marcus Pollard at Clifton Finch Aviaries

This bird is a member of the mannikin family and, as such, should not be kept with nuns, yellow rumps or munias. I have always found them to be peaceful in a large aviary and, if trouble erupts, they are usually the victim rather than the aggressor. However, I am aware of people that have kept them in small aviaries and had them bully other finches. Will breed happily with just soaked/sprouted seed and green grasses. 
They are fairly shy and will look for remote areas of the aviary to build their nests. No lining is usually used in their nests and this can present a problem if they attempt to breed in cooler months. In the wild they climb up seed heads to feed and if you hang green grass heads from the ceiling of your aviary in a loop of wire they will spend hours stripping these. They are long lived and I have a friend who has one that is 8 years old and still going strong! 
A popularity of 4 and a compatibility of 7.

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